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Table 1 Neurosensory Measurements Before & After Stress Testing

From: Non-invasive neurosensory testing used to diagnose and confirm successful surgical management of lower extremity deep distal posterior compartment syndrome

Cutaneous Pressure Thresholds for Static Two-Point Discrimination*
  Prior to 1st Posterior Distal Compartment Release (A) After 1st Posterior Distal Compartment Release (B) After 2nd Posterior Distal Compartment Release (C)
RIGHT LEG       
   Tibial Nerve Before Exercise After Exercise Before Exercise After Exercise Before Exercise After Exercise
Hallux Pulp       
mm 10 15 8 12 5 5
gm/mm 2 43 60 46 52 63 66
Medial Heel       
mm 11 15 8 12 8 5
gm/mm 2 40 58 82 79 96 68
Peroneal Nerve       
1st web space       
mm 5 5 8 10 5 5
gm/mm 2 60 88 60 68 53 56
Dorsolateral** NA NA NA NA NA NA
LEFT LEG       
   Tibial Nerve       
Hallux Pulp       
mm 4 8 10 10 5 5
gm/mm 2 38 97 40 52 79 75
Medial Heel       
mm 5 15 8 8 5 5
gm/mm 2 45 82 92 69 52 64
Peroneal Nerve       
1st web space       
mm 5 5 8 8 5 5
gm/mm 2 35 77 95 80 73 52
Dorsolateral       
mm 7 7 7 7 7 7
gm/mm 2 37 78 90 79 53 71
  1. *Two-point static-touch; normative values in the foot for someone less than 45 years of age have a pressure of about 15 gm/mm2 to discriminate one from two static points at 6 mm distance apart. ** The right superficial peroneal nerve was resected previously and the anterior and lateral compartments released previously.
  2. A) Interpretation: the distance required to discriminate one from two point static-touchincreased for the tibial nerve on both the right and left sides after exercise, consistent with bilateral (right worse than left) posterior compartment syndrome. Note that the peroneal nerve measurements on the left and right did not change, and that the anterior and lateral compartments had been released previously.
  3. B) Interpretation: There is still an increase in the right tibial nerve measurements for discrimination of one from two point static-touch, indicating that despite fasciotomy of the deep compartment on the right, there is still compression of the tibial nerve in the distal deep compartment. Neurosensory testing demonstrates that another fasciotomy is still required. The lack of change in left tibial nerve may be a timing phenomenon as the right leg was tested first after the patient stopped running.
  4. C) Interpretation: After complete decompression of the deep distal posterior compartment bilaterally, there is now no increase in the distance required to discriminate one from two static-touch points, consistent with complete release of the deep distal posterior compartments and return of normal tibial nerve function.